Log out
My profile and settings
My bookmarks
Comment history
Please complete your account verification. Resend verification email.
today
This verification token has expired.
today
Your email address has been verified. Update my profile.
today
Your account has been deactivated. Sign in to re-activate your account.
today
View all newsletters in the newsletter archive
today
You are now unsubscribed from receiving emails.
today
Sorry, we were unable to unsubscribe you at this time.
today
0
0
Back to profile
Comment Items
You have not left any comments yet.
title
you replied to a comment:
name
description
Saved Posts
You haven’t bookmarked any posts yet.
“The blood flow in the modern human brain is 600 percent greater than it was in early humans.”
read more
Become a Gates Notes Insider
Sign up
Log out
Personal Information
Title
Mr
Mrs
Ms
Miss
Mx
Dr
Cancel
Save
This email is already registered
Cancel
Save
Please verify email address. Click verification link sent to this email address or resend verification email.
Cancel
Save
Address
Cancel
Save
Email and Notification Settings
Send me updates from Bill Gates
You must provide an email
On
Off
Send me Gates Notes survey emails
On
Off
Send me the weekly Top of Mind newsletter
On
Off
Email me comment notifications
On
Off
On-screen comment notifications
On
Off
Interests
Select interests to personalize your profile and experience on Gates Notes.
Saving Lives
Energy Innovation
Improving Education
Alzheimer's
Philanthropy
Book Reviews
About Bill Gates
Account Deactivation
Click the link below to begin the account deactivation process.
If you would like to permanently delete your Gates Notes account and remove it’s content, please send us a request here.
Well Suited
Arming doctors to fight Ebola
As I learned recently, it’s one thing to find a new tool that will help the people fighting this deadly disease. Getting it to them is another story.
|
0

Getting new tools into the hands of the people fighting Ebola is much harder than it needs to be. I have experience with one alarming example.

Health workers in protective suits get so hot that they have a hard time caring for their patients. (For example your goggles fog up and you sweat profusely.) I asked a team of experts who work on technology for keeping vaccines cold to refocus on keeping the medical workers cool.

Suiting Up for Ebola

Within days, the team had found an existing solution: a vest with pockets where you could insert cooling packs.

Suiting Up for Ebola

Doctors who had treated Ebola patients in West Africa helped test and improve these cooling vests. Here you see Dr. Colin Bucks of Stanford University testing a vest and suit at home while under quarantine after working in Liberia. He rode a stationary bike to simulate the heat of West Africa.

Suiting Up for Ebola

Unfortunately, there was no coordinated system for getting the vests to West Africa. The team had to create new distribution channels by working directly with treatment centers in the region. They eventually got the suits to over a thousand health workers.

Suiting Up for Ebola

Although this wasn’t a critical issue, it is just one example of the challenge of preparing for a highly infectious disease. We see similar breakdowns in detecting outbreaks early, training and deploying volunteers, coordinating with the military, and more. But I’m optimistic that if we start now and stay focused, we can get ready for the next epidemic.

Suiting Up for Ebola

Read this next
NEXT