Log out
My profile and settings
My bookmarks
Comment history
Please complete your account verification. Resend verification email.
today
This verification token has expired.
today
Your email address has been verified. Update my profile.
today
Your account has been deactivated. Sign in to re-activate your account.
today
View all newsletters in the newsletter archive
today
You are now unsubscribed from receiving emails.
today
Sorry, we were unable to unsubscribe you at this time.
today
0
0
Back to profile
Comment Items
You have not left any comments yet.
title
you replied to a comment:
name
description
Saved Posts
You haven’t bookmarked any posts yet.
“This is our 10th Annual Letter, and we’re marking the occasion by answering 10 tough questions that people ask us.”
read more
Become a Gates Notes Insider
Sign up
Log out
Personal Information
Title
Mr
Mrs
Ms
Miss
Mx
Dr
Cancel
Save
This email is already registered
Cancel
Save
Please verify email address. Click verification link sent to this email address or resend verification email.
Cancel
Save
Address
Cancel
Save
Email and Notification Settings
Send me updates from Bill Gates
You must provide an email
On
Off
Send me Gates Notes survey emails
On
Off
Send me the weekly Top of Mind newsletter
On
Off
Email me comment notifications
On
Off
On-screen comment notifications
On
Off
Interests
Select interests to personalize your profile and experience on Gates Notes.
Saving Lives
Energy Innovation
Improving Education
Alzheimer's
Philanthropy
Book Reviews
About Bill Gates
Account Deactivation
Click the link below to begin the account deactivation process.
If you would like to permanently delete your Gates Notes account and remove it’s content, please send us a request here.
Can’t Trump Bridge
What Makes for a Good Bridge Partner?
I learned to play bridge from my parents, but it became one of my favorite pastimes after I began playing with Warren Buffett.
|
0

I’m lucky that I get to play with bridge players who are dramatically better than I am, and who are nice enough that they will understand my game and appreciate why maybe I led the wrong thing or didn’t shift to the right suit or evaluated the hand just slightly wrong. They’ll make comments that add to my knowledge, increasing the chance I might do it right next time. And that’s a lot of fun.

I’m amazed that some of these bridge players remember all the hands. You play 50 or 60 hands in a day, and you go to dinner that night, and they know every single one. Bob Hamman, one of the greatest bridge players of all times, is kind of the ultimate of that. If I misplayed some hand three years ago, he can still tell you the spot cards that were in there. Bob himself has misplayed very few hands when I’ve played with him, but I do make sure to remember those so I have my modest defense ready.

The classic form of the game is the team format where you have four people and you're playing for the normal game-type scores. Warren Buffett prefers that, because it’s just the traditional form of the game, and doesn’t make a big deal of the small differences of a no-trump contract versus a suit contract.

I like both team and match point. I like match points because there are just two of you playing, so there are slightly fewer variables. You usually get hand records afterwards, and a lot of tables play the same hand, and so you can look at all those different scores and see what happened. And because it’s so excruciatingly important to take every trick you can, match point highlights any sloppiness in defensive or declarative play. So it forces you to think, okay, I’ve got to learn about squeezes, I’ve got to keep track of the shape of the hands I don’t know as the hand goes on, and take full advantage of that.

So, I really like the mix of the two. If you get the right team of four, that’s a lot of fun because it’s a social thing as well as kind of a mental challenge.

Read this next
NEXT