gatesnotes
The blog of Bill Gates

What Is the G20? (And Why Am I Going?)

Sign In
 
My Profile & Settings
Log out
GO
Your search for "", with selected filters, does not match any posts. Please try again with a different search term or reset filters.

Popular searches include: Books, Malaria, and Future of Food.
RELATED ARTICLES ON
Logout:


Become a Gates Notes Insider
- or - Sign up with email
This email is already registered. Enter a new email, try signing in or retrieve your password
Send me updates from Bill Gates
Sign Up
Join the Gates Notes community to access exclusive content, comment on stories, subscribe to your favorite topics and more. We will never share or spam your email address. For more information see our Sign Up FAQ. By clicking "Sign Up" you agree to the Gates Notes Terms of Use / Privacy Policy.
Account Settings
VIEW & EDIT PROFILE
Your Information
First name
Last name
Save
Cancel
Email address
This email is already registered
Save
Cancel
Please verify email address. Click verification link sent to this email address or resend verification email.
Password
Save
Cancel
Send me updates from Bill Gates
You must provide an email
Your Interests
Saving Lives
Energy Innovation
Improving Education
Philanthropy
Book Reviews
About Bill Gates
Deactivate Account
Click the link below to begin the account deactivation process. Deactivate account If you want to permanently delete your account and remove its content, please send us a request here.
Ok
Gates Notes Insider Sign Up FAQ

Q. How do I create a Gates Notes account?

A. There are three ways you can create a Gates Notes account:

  • Sign up with Facebook. We’ll never post to your Facebook account without your permission.
  • Sign up with Twitter. We’ll never post to your Twitter account without your permission.
  • Sign up with your email. Enter your email address during sign up. We’ll email you a link for verification.

Q. Will you ever post to my Facebook or Twitter accounts without my permission?

A. No, never.

Q. How do I sign up to receive email communications from my Gates Notes account?

A. In Account Settings, click the toggle switch next to “Send me updates from Bill Gates.”

Q. How will you use the Interests I select in Account Settings?

A. We will use them to choose the Suggested Reads that appear on your profile page.

Forgot your password?
This email is already registered. Enter a new email, try signing in or retrieve your password
Reset Password
Change your header photo
your image
 
Change
your image
Uh Oh!

The image you are trying to upload is either too big or is an unacceptable format. Please upload a .jpg or .png image that is under 25MB.

Ok
First name
Last name
Enter a first and last name. For example, "Richard Feynman"
Bio
0/160 characters
Edit Profile
Account Settings
Save
Cancel
Suggested Reads
Reset your password.
Set New Password
Your password has been reset. You will now be redirected to the sign in page, or you can click here
Ok
Get emails from Bill Gates
Send me updates from Bill
You must provide an email
This email is already registered
Continue
We will never share or spam your email address. For more information see our Sign Up FAQ. By clicking "Continue" you agree to the Gates Notes Terms of Use / Privacy Policy.
 
your image
Uh Oh!
The image you are trying to upload is either too big or is an unacceptable format. Please upload a .jpg or .png image that is under 25MB.
Ok
Welcome FirstName!
You are now a Gates Notes Insider
Update Your Profile Information
First name
Last name
Save
Cancel
Email address
This email is already registered
Save
Cancel
Please verify email address. Click verification link sent to this email address or resend verification email.
Send me updates from Bill Gates
You must provide an email
Select Your Interests
Saving Lives
Energy Innovation
Improving Education
Philanthropy
Book Reviews
About Bill Gates
Continue
Confirm
Are you sure you want to
deactivate your account?
Deactivating your account will unsubscribe you from Gates Notes emails, and will remove your profile and account information from public view on the Gates Notes. Please allow for 24 hours for the deactivation to fully process. You can sign back in at any time to reactivate your account and restore its content.
Deactivate My Acccount
Go Back
Your Gates Notes account has been deactivated.
Come back anytime.
Welcome back
In order to unsubscribe you will need to sign-in to your Gates Notes Insider account
Once signed in just go to your Account Settings page and set your subscription options as desired.
Sign In
Request account deletion
We’re sorry to see you go. Your request may take a few days to process; we want to double check things before hitting the big red button. Requesting an account deletion will permanently remove all of your profile content. If you’ve changed your mind about deleting your account, you can always hit cancel and deactivate instead.
Submit
Cancel
Thank You! Your request has been sent
Become a Gates Notes Insider for access to exclusive content and personalized reading suggestions
Sign up to receive occasional updates from the Gates Notes
Sign Up
Privacy Policy
Please complete your account verification. Resend verification email.
This verification token has expired.
Your email address has been verified. Update my profile.
Your account has been deactivated. Sign up to re-activate your account.
View all newsletters in the newsletter archive
You are now unsubscribed from receiving emails.
Sorry, we were unable to unsubscribe you at this time.
What Is the G20? (And Why Am I Going?)
 
Hello, . . My Profile & Settings
Log out
FOLLOW ME
It looks like you're using an older version of Internet Explorer which may not display all the features on this site. Upgrade Now » close
It's Important

What Is the G20? (And Why Am I Going?)

This week, I’m going to stand in front of the leaders of the largest 20 nations on earth and ask them to keep their promises – and to re-commit to helping the poorest people on earth.  How on earth did I get here?

Well, first off, I was asked. The French President, Nicolas Sarkozy on behalf of the G20 invited me to prepare a report about creative ways to find more money for development aid. I’m very honored to be presenting a report to the G20 Summit, increasingly the most important forum for advancing international economic development. In this time of crisis for the world economy, I’m grateful that the summit is setting aside time to discuss development assistance to the world’s poorest people.

I’m excited to have a chance to contribute to the growing realization within G20 countries that their own prosperity depends on their helping raise the living standards of the world’s poorest. As the G20 declared at the summit in Seoul a year ago, “For prosperity to be sustained it must be shared.”

Formally known as the Group of 20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors, the grouping was set up in 1999 in response to the financial crises of that decade and to bring together important industrialized and developing economies to discuss issues in the world economy. The United States, European Union and other large industrial economies all belong, along with dynamic, emerging ones such as China, India and Brazil. Presidents and prime ministers often participate in summits, along with their finance ministers and central bankers, and leaders of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank.

To me, the G20 is more important than ever now, because the world economy is in a precarious state, and if it weakens further, the world’s poorest people will be the ones who suffer the most. The governments in Cannes represent the countries in a position to play a role in driving development forward and getting the world economy back on track. The delegates include representatives from rich countries as well as rapidly emerging and poor countries.

Yet in difficult times like these, when unemployment is high in many rich countries, it’s easy for them to maybe forget about conditions in poor countries. That’s why I’m especially glad to see the G20 continuing to focus on development aid not only as a humanitarian obligation but also as a way to help stabilize demand and growth worldwide, which is the G20’s core mission.

My report will encourage the G20 to emphasize support for innovation that can spur development, especially innovation within developing countries. I have ideas about how industrialized countries can increase support for aid programs, and how to get the private sector more involved. The G20 can bring together resources, innovative ideas and leadership, which can have a huge impact in a new world of development.

Become a Gates Notes Insider for access to exclusive content and personalized reading suggestions

Read previous versions of the Annual Letter


Discussion
comments powered by Disqus