gatesnotes
The blog of Bill Gates

The End of a Crazy Week in NYC

Sign In
 
My Profile & Settings
Log out
GO
Your search for "", with selected filters, does not match any posts. Please try again with a different search term or reset filters.

Popular searches include: Books, Malaria, and Future of Food.
RELATED ARTICLES ON
Logout:


Become a Gates Notes Insider
- or - Sign up with email
This email is already registered. Enter a new email, try signing in or retrieve your password
Send me updates from Bill Gates
Sign Up
Join the Gates Notes community to access exclusive content, comment on stories, subscribe to your favorite topics and more. We will never share or spam your email address. For more information see our Sign Up FAQ. By clicking "Sign Up" you agree to the Gates Notes Terms of Use / Privacy Policy.
Account Settings
VIEW & EDIT PROFILE
Your Information
First name
Last name
Save
Cancel
Email address
This email is already registered
Save
Cancel
Please verify email address. Click verification link sent to this email address or resend verification email.
Password
Save
Cancel
Send me updates from Bill Gates
You must provide an email
Your Interests
Saving Lives
Energy Innovation
Improving Education
Philanthropy
Book Reviews
About Bill Gates
Deactivate Account
Click the link below to begin the account deactivation process. Deactivate account If you want to permanently delete your account and remove its content, please send us a request here.
Ok
Gates Notes Insider Sign Up FAQ

Q. How do I create a Gates Notes account?

A. There are three ways you can create a Gates Notes account:

  • Sign up with Facebook. We’ll never post to your Facebook account without your permission.
  • Sign up with Twitter. We’ll never post to your Twitter account without your permission.
  • Sign up with your email. Enter your email address during sign up. We’ll email you a link for verification.

Q. Will you ever post to my Facebook or Twitter accounts without my permission?

A. No, never.

Q. How do I sign up to receive email communications from my Gates Notes account?

A. In Account Settings, click the toggle switch next to “Send me updates from Bill Gates.”

Q. How will you use the Interests I select in Account Settings?

A. We will use them to choose the Suggested Reads that appear on your profile page.

Forgot your password?
This email is already registered. Enter a new email, try signing in or retrieve your password
Reset Password
Change your header photo
your image
 
Change
your image
Uh Oh!

The image you are trying to upload is either too big or is an unacceptable format. Please upload a .jpg or .png image that is under 25MB.

Ok
First name
Last name
Enter a first and last name. For example, "Richard Feynman"
Bio
0/160 characters
Edit Profile
Account Settings
Save
Cancel
Suggested Reads
Reset your password.
Set New Password
Your password has been reset. You will now be redirected to the sign in page, or you can click here
Ok
Get emails from Bill Gates
Send me updates from Bill
You must provide an email
This email is already registered
Continue
We will never share or spam your email address. For more information see our Sign Up FAQ. By clicking "Continue" you agree to the Gates Notes Terms of Use / Privacy Policy.
 
your image
Uh Oh!
The image you are trying to upload is either too big or is an unacceptable format. Please upload a .jpg or .png image that is under 25MB.
Ok
Welcome FirstName!
You are now a Gates Notes Insider
Update Your Profile Information
First name
Last name
Save
Cancel
Email address
This email is already registered
Save
Cancel
Please verify email address. Click verification link sent to this email address or resend verification email.
Send me updates from Bill Gates
You must provide an email
Select Your Interests
Saving Lives
Energy Innovation
Improving Education
Philanthropy
Book Reviews
About Bill Gates
Continue
Confirm
Are you sure you want to
deactivate your account?
Deactivating your account will unsubscribe you from Gates Notes emails, and will remove your profile and account information from public view on the Gates Notes. Please allow for 24 hours for the deactivation to fully process. You can sign back in at any time to reactivate your account and restore its content.
Deactivate My Acccount
Go Back
Your Gates Notes account has been deactivated.
Come back anytime.
Welcome back
In order to unsubscribe you will need to sign-in to your Gates Notes Insider account
Once signed in just go to your Account Settings page and set your subscription options as desired.
Sign In
Request account deletion
We’re sorry to see you go. Your request may take a few days to process; we want to double check things before hitting the big red button. Requesting an account deletion will permanently remove all of your profile content. If you’ve changed your mind about deleting your account, you can always hit cancel and deactivate instead.
Submit
Cancel
Thank You! Your request has been sent
Become a Gates Notes Insider for access to exclusive content and personalized reading suggestions
Sign up to receive occasional updates from the Gates Notes
Sign Up
Privacy Policy
Please complete your account verification. Resend verification email.
This verification token has expired.
Your email address has been verified. Update my profile.
Your account has been deactivated. Sign up to re-activate your account.
View all newsletters in the newsletter archive
You are now unsubscribed from receiving emails.
Sorry, we were unable to unsubscribe you at this time.
The End of a Crazy Week in NYC
 
Hello, . . My Profile & Settings
Log out
FOLLOW ME
It looks like you're using an older version of Internet Explorer which may not display all the features on this site. Upgrade Now » close
Crazy Good

The End of a Crazy Week in NYC

It was a terrific final day at the U.N. for Melinda and me today. The highlight was our chance to address the members of the General Assembly at a special meeting to discuss the Millennium Development Goals’ progress and their renewal after they expire in 2015.

It was a tremendous honor that they asked us to join this meeting and gave us the chance to give our own thoughts along with the many heads of state and other dignitaries who took to the podium. For an enterprise that was looked at with some real skepticism in the beginning (including by me), it was amazing to see person after person speak about the remarkable accomplishments it has facilitated—leading to remarkable improvements in the lives of the poor. Melinda said it very nicely in her remarks:

Behind these numbers are men and women who today have a better chance to realize basic aspirations that aren’t so different from anyone in this room: a healthy, happy family; the joy of watching your children grow; the freedom that comes with education; the dignity of being treated as an equal.

I followed her and spoke about my hopes for the new goals to follow in 2015. For me, it is critical that they focus on extreme poverty. The MDGs are the most successful antipoverty initiative the world has ever undertaken. And they should remain both ambitious and pragmatic—because that is part of the genius of the first set of goals. That means they need to be measurable, actionable, and based on a wide consensus. The focus of the first set of MDGs contributed to their success, so it will be important to resist the temptation to throw in a large number of other concerns as they are renewed.

But I’m optimistic. I closed my short remarks with something of a pep talk for the delegates who will be doing the heavy lifting to get this next set of MDGs agreed to:

“We have a special opportunity. By 2030, if we stay on track, it is reasonable to predict that we’ll be very close to global equity in key categories. If we get this right, we can achieve a world in which a child from a poor country is as likely to survive and thrive as a child in a rich country.”

And I closed with a promise that our foundation will help any way that we can.

After our speeches, we did a bit of “stumping” for the MDGs with interviews with CNN International and the BBC. Not surprisingly, we were asked about the shocking tragedy in Kenya. But we both saw a link between giving people a real chance at a healthy and productive life and the reduction of these kinds of terrible acts. The MDGs are an important step in the right direction. 

Melinda and I were able to speak with Japan’s Prime Minister, Shinzo Abe, and Canada’s Prime Minister, Stephen Harper. Over the years, both countries have been important supporters of development aid, we took the opportunity to update them on worldwide vaccination efforts and on the progress of the polio eradication work.

Melinda joined Prime Minister Harper in an event hosted by the Secretary-General’s Every Woman, Every Child initiative, which is focused on the unfinished agenda of the MDGs with regard to women and development. Also participating were President Jakaya Kikwete of Tanzania, President Goodluck Jonathan of Nigeria, PM Jens Stoltenberg of Norway, and the Director-General of the WHO, Margaret Chan. In her remarks, Melinda talked about her own experience in seeing how women drive development. She also urged that the next set of MDGs be even more driven by data and measurement than the first set (themes that are dear to my heart), because that’s the best way to ensure that our efforts do the most good for women and children.

U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon was in the midst of his busiest week of the year, but he invited us to visit him briefly. Besides thanking him for his hospitality, we expressed our gratitude for his leadership on the MDGs and his remarkable support for the effort to eradicate polio. Getting to spend time with him and with the WHO’s Margaret Chan was really encouraging as we tackle this tough but important challenge.

My last appointment of the day was a short visit with Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, famous anti-apartheid activist and former South African politician who is the first female head of the African Union Commission. Because so much of our work touches Africa, I was happy to get the chance to speak with her and update her on our concerns and hopes for our work there.

This is a crazy week. With so many heads of state and other VIPs in Manhattan, it’s easy to see why locals complain about the traffic and congestion. But it is a remarkable intersection of people and causes—and a worthwhile place for Melinda and me to spend time as we work on the issues that we’re so passionate about. Being in the company of so many others who share our optimism about improving the lives of the world’s poorest made the trip completely worthwhile.

Become a Gates Notes Insider for access to exclusive content and personalized reading suggestions

Read previous versions of the Annual Letter


Discussion
comments powered by Disqus