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“How would you describe 2018? Was it what you expected?”
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A Computing Pioneer
Remembering Ed Roberts
Ed Roberts, a very special man and personal computing pioneer, passed away on April 1. The following joint statement was issued by me and Paul G. Allen as Microsoft founders.
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Ed Roberts, a very special man and personal computing pioneer, passed away on April 1. The following joint statement was issued by Microsoft co-founders Bill Gates and Paul G. Allen.

We are deeply saddened by the passing of our friend and early mentor, Ed Roberts, and our thoughts and prayers are with his family.

Ed was truly a pioneer in the personal computer revolution, and didn’t always get the recognition he deserved. He was an intense man with a great sense of humor, and he always cared deeply about the people who worked for him, including us. Ed was willing to take a chance on us—two young guys interested in computers long before they were commonplace—and we have always been grateful to him. The day our first untested software worked on his Altair was the start of a lot of great things. We will always have many fond memories of working with Ed in Albuquerque, in the MITS office right on Route 66—where so many exciting things happened that none of us could have imagined back then.

More than anything, what we will always remember about Ed was how deeply compassionate he was—and that was never more true than when he decided to spend the second half of his life going to medical school and working as a country doctor making house calls. He will be missed by many and we were lucky to have known him.

Note to Editors: Ed Roberts was the founder of MITS and inventor of the Altair 8800, widely credited as the world’s first personal computer. It was featured on the cover of Popular Electronics in 1975, when Paul Allen and Bill Gates contacted Roberts and offered to write software for the machine. Gates and Allen worked with MITS in Albuquerque, NM, and started Microsoft. In 1977, Roberts sold MITS and retired to Georgia where he studied medicine and became a small-town doctor.

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